Things I don't understand - a non-comprehensive list

Friday, August 14, 2020


1. Why people like form fitting shirts when they exercise. Even with the moisture-wicking fabric, I find these garments to be intensely uncomfortable, because as soon as I start to sweat, they remind me of seaweed sticking to my skin after exiting the ocean. Ew. 

2. How people who claimed they "only" supported tRump because of the economy can now live with themselves as they come up with other excuses for supporting a bigoted, misogynistic, white supremacist megalomaniac who has overseen the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. You might want to cover up, you guys. Your cognitive dissonance is showing, not to mention your intellectual dishonesty.

3. People eating broccoli. The Devil's weed. It even smells disgusting. 🤢

4. Why people put their ego above desired outcomes, especially when the outcome is a monetary one in a business environment. 

5. The idea that property is more important than people. 

6. Why it always seems like every woman who seeks to break a glass ceiling ("coincidentally") has one or more fatal flaws. And the older the person, the more likely they are to say, "It's not that I don't want a woman in the White House. I just don't want this woman." And you can substitute this for basically any woman who is in serious contention. You can protest your innocence all you want, people - it's still transparent. 

7. Why people still don't seem to give a shit about climate change. It's going to affect the human race in some pretty draconian ways - why don't we care more? Of course, a good percentage of Americans don't give a crap that the November election is being subverted as we speak, and that has more immediate consequences, so forget I asked.

Helping Others to Help Themselves

Monday, August 3, 2020

The memorial plaque at our local library
The memorial plaque at our local library
July 31, 2013 was the worst day of my life. It was the worst day of my life because that was the day the Police Department came to our home to tell us that our precious daughter Moe had died of suicide at the age of 22.

Moe died of uncontrolled mental illness. She experienced severe depression, and was under a doctor's care for her condition. But we lost her anyway, leaving a Moe-shaped hole in my heart that nothing is able to fill.

Every day I mourn her loss in this world, and I would give everything to have her here with us again. But I can't do that, so instead I choose to perform service projects in her memory such as being a good ally to the LGBTQ+ community, and donating money to institutions she cared about, like our local library foundation.

And I also support AFSP's mission in helping people who are at risk overcome their lack of hope and help those who have been affected by suicide.

This is the fourth year I've been up to participating in this event personally, but this will be the seventh year the Maureen's Marchers team is hitting the road in my baby girl's name on the annual Out of the Darkness Denver Metro Experience. The money raised in this event will go to fighting suicide and supporting AFSP's goal to reduce the suicide rate 20% by 2025. This goal is especially challenging in our current situation, where people are feeling isolated, anxious and uncertain of what the future will bring.

The danger of suicide is especially high within the LGBTQ+ community. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is the second leading cause of death among youth aged 15 to 24 and the third leading cause of death among youth aged 10 to 14. Among youth who identify as sexual minorities, the likelihood of death by suicide has been estimated to be two to seven times greater than the likelihood of death by suicide among heterosexual youth. These kids need help, and it's up to us to provide it in any way we can.

Please help us honor our lost, beloved Moe-Moe and consider donating to the AFSP. All donations are 100% tax deductible and benefit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), funding research, education, advocacy, and support for those affected by suicide. The AFSP is a Charity Navigator 4 star charity, and they spend 83.6% of their total budget on program expenses.

You can donate to the AFSP by clicking on the donation badge on the right, or you can go directly to my fundraising page. This year I'm offering incentives for donations at the $50, $100, $200, and $500 range, including hand-knitted items in the colors of your choice to keep you warm this winter. 

"When you are sorrowful look again at your own heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight." ~ Khalil Gibron

Thank you for your support!