'Tard of the Week - The American Public

Wednesday, December 23, 2009
And why is the American Public the 'Tard this week? Because we thought that "health care reform" would actually result in, you know, reform.  Instead, the insurance companies will get a whole new set of healthy consumers that will now be forced to purchase health insurance from these for-profit companies. This goldmine is supposed to offset the new restriction on insurance companies that will prevent them from dropping sick people from their rolls. Of course, the fact that they'll be required under the law to insure these people in no way obligates them to keep the premiums in a range where a normal American family can actually afford to buy the insurance. And it in no way actually obligates the insurance companies to approve the treatments and medications these people need. You can bet your last Lipitor prescription that this so-called 'reform' will not result in reduced earnings and/or profits for insurance companies. The companies made sure of that, with their bought-and-paid-for toadies on Capital Hill.


I know I'm supposed to be making an effort to be less stabby these days, but this really chaps my ass.* How, exactly, is this a good deal for the majority of Americans? It seems to me that it's a good deal for the insurance companies (more profits!), and it's a good deal for the politicians (we passed health care reform!), and it's a good deal for the Congressional Districts who will be the recipients of the pork that was used to get the votes (I got us a new hospital!), but for us? Not so much. Instead, we get that sinking feeling that comes from knowing that you've been screwed - again. You'd think we'd learn, and not have such high expectations for a system that has proved again and again and again that it has more loyalty to K Street than to its constituents.

But we don't. Because we're 'tards.


*Shut up, Nathan.

8 comments:

Mrs. Bitch said...

If there is one bright spot in this whole stinking, reeking mess, it's that Republicans, and conservatives in general, have had to take a good long look at what their party actually represents. If they're happy with what they see, someone call Jack Kervorkian for me. No, never mind. I wouldn't give the asshats the satisfaction. I'll move someplace warm, with universal medical care.

The other bright spot in all of this is that I realized I'm progressive more than just Democrat. How that helps you is beyond me, but work with me here.

All we can do at this point is try and block as many Repubictards from gaining seats as we can, and to try and get rid of as many blue dogs as possible.

Bachmann is popular; Palin is popular. This doesn't bode well for the future if we don't stick together and stay involved. Christ, all I need are some pom-poms.

Um, back on topic - heh heh. Liberal analysts whose opinions I respect (Krugman, et al) are saying that we should back this bill and hope to improve it later, as opposed to killing it. I am making the leap of faith to trust they know what the hell they're talking about.

WendyB_09 said...

Yep. And the way I heard it explained as they rode out of sight last night was those of us that can't afford insurance now will be forced into either buying coverage we still can't afford OR be fined by the government.

A win-win for all...NOT!!!

Janiece said...

Mrs. Bitch, I'm not really partisan in that way. I'm registered as an "independent," because quite frankly, being associated with any party who can be bought and paid for by K Street makes me throw up in my mouth a little. And let's face it - the Dems aren't really on the moral high ground in that respect, are they?

I self identify as a tax and spend liberal because that most closely aligns with my political beliefs. But I am fiscally conservative, a position which has traditionally been associated with the conservative movement of William F. Buckley. Now, of course, everyone seems to be on the "bread and circuses" bandwagon, except those retarded Tea Baggers. I'd rather take my own eye out with a fork than be associated with those idiots, of course, but having a balanced budget matters, and it's quite unfortunate that it's now associated with the fringe rather than the mainstream.

I want health care reform that doesn't stick it to people like Wendy. I'm willing to pay higher taxes to get it. But such a desire seems like a pipe dream at this point.

Yeah. Thanks a lot, Washington.

Shannon said...

I feel like a 'tard. I actually thought when I voted my party into the Majority that we would get some real change. As soon as I can, I'm switching my voter registration and my allegiance to Independent. I've had it with everyone in Congress!

Janiece said...

Welcome, Shannon.

I hear you. Boy, do I hear you. At this point I'm all about voting for the candidate whose views most closely aligns to my own. Republican, Democrat, whatever. I'm deathly sick of the WHOLE THING.

Steve Buchheit said...

I didn't get all I wanted, but I'll take some of the changes. And we haven't seen the conference committee report yet, so it'll change (hopefully). Also, don't forget the subsidies. It'll be interesting to see who gets to pay for that (the "rich" or those with "Cadillac" plans).

Janiece said...

Steve, I'm glad somebody's able to look at the bright side. I'm just so crushingly disappointed...

jr said...

Wow! Someone mentioned Bill Buckley - I used to watch him on Face the Nation as a kid. Our family was pretty far on the left side of the aisle, but I always respected his fiscal responsibility and most importantly his civility. I am willing to listen to anyone who will discuss an issue civilly - Al Franken and Bill OReilly take note.