Lieutenant Commander Richard Jadick

Tuesday, January 29, 2008
In November 2004, in the middle of Operation Phantom Fury in Fallujah, Iraq, an ordinary man became a person of extraordinary courage.

Lieutenant Commander Richard Jadick is a Navy Reserve doctor. A Urologist, in fact. He's stationed at Camp Lejeune, NC, and had very little emergency medicine experience when he deployed to Iraq.

But when Operation Phantom Fury begun, all he could see were the Marines he was there to treat, and insisted on moving his field hospital closer to the wounded...and the action. He and his corpsmen treated wounded marine after wounded marine, while the bullets, shrapnel and rocket propelled grenades dropped all around them. Was he afraid? You bet. Gut-wrenchingly afraid. He said "The only thing that kept me going was the other fear: the fear of failing everybody who was out there."

What a novel idea...dedication to duty, and a willingness to put oneself in harm's way for the benefit of others.

LCDR Jadick was awarded the Bronze Star with a Combat "V" for his actions during that operation. LCDR Jadick downplays his role in the operation, continuously mentioning that it was a team effort, and that his corpsmen were in just as much danger as he was. I am absolutely certain that's true, and those individuals deserve recognition for their actions. But LCDR Jadick exercised leadership, and that matters. His example allowed his corpsmen to be their very best selves in a time of intense stress and fear, and his leadership resulted in many wounded Marines being alive today.

So LCDR Jadick, thank you for your service, and I am proud to have worn the same uniform as you. Non sibi sed patriae.

10 comments:

Shawn Powers said...

We've had dialogs here before (I'm too lazy to dig up a link) regarding the thankfulness we show to vets. While the appreciation factor of gushing gratefulness is different with every service person -- I just wish everyone would appreciate the things that are done for us.

I'm not saying you need to go lick a veteran on the head, or to buy a dozen roses for the soldiers as they come home, but dog gonnit, appreciate what they've done.

So thank you Lieutenant Commander Richard Jadick. Thank you Jim Wright. Thank you Janiece. Thank you Stonekettle Station reader that served in the military.

Ok, I'm done being all sappy now. Jim's stories always get to me...

Shawn Powers said...

Whoops, I just hit next on my RSS reader, and assumed the story was on Stonekettle Station.

So please mentally edit the above comment to fit with the Hot Chicks blog.

Janiece Murphy said...

No problem, Shawn. When it comes to writings about veterans and the military, Jim and I tend to engage in the Vulcan Mind Meld. Or perhaps something less creepy.

Nathan said...

Seeing stories like this always gives me a lump in the throat. Not to take anything away from anyone else, but when the story is about someone who can't shoot back, that just puts it over the top for me.

Tom said...

Yes, thanks to the ones who serve, thanks to the ones who have served, and thanks to those who did serve, all the way back.

The world is a better place because of them.

Janiece Murphy said...

Nathan, me too. These types of stories get me all "Band of Brothers."

Steve Buchheit said...

Well said.

Jeri said...

Thanks for sharing this! The man does sound like a tremendous leader, worthy of recognition and thanks.

I was very cheered last night during the SOTU address when the standing ovation for the troops went on... and on... and on.

JJ said...

I wanted to take this opportunity to Thank Doc Jaddick. I knew him back in the day before he was "the toughest urologist in the world". I served onboard the USS Bataan and USS Kearsarge with him in 1999 and 2000 and I knew then that he was a great doctor, but his attitude and his treatment of us Corpsman was what really stood out. He was always looking to teach us how to do something. When I first eread about his efforts in Iraq I was not surprised. Good job Doc, Semper Fi.

Formerly HM3 HUNSICKER

Janiece Murphy said...

Welcome, JJ.

I'm glad to hear he's a good officer as well as a good combat doc.

That pearl of great price.

And JJ? Thanks for your service, shipmate.