I Need a New Hobby

Monday, August 2, 2010
Well, I've decided not to take a class this fall at the University of Denver. Since I took two classes this summer to accommodate my required study abroad requirement, I've used up my tuition assistance entitlement for the year, and I'd have to pay out of pocket. Since the classes offered didn't appeal to me, and my Smart Girl still requires financial assistance for her own college experience, I've decided to save the money and goof off for the rest of the year.

The problem with that plan, of course, is that for me, going to school is almost a hobby. My company requires that I have a degree plan and that I work on it in order for me to receive tuition assistance, but really - I'd go regardless. I like the structure of learning in a classroom environment, and the degree plan requirement has actually forced me to take classes I would not otherwise have taken. I consider broadening my intellectual horizons a good thing, especially when my awesome benefits foot the majority of the bill.

So I think I'm going to find myself somewhat at loose ends for the rest of the year, since I won't have any homework or discussion board requirements.

Of course, I am in the middle of a mini-remodel of the Big Yellow House which is consisting of painting one room a month and changing the accessories and decorations while I'm at it, but that's still only one room a month - I can usually pick at that over the course of a single week and get it done without too much stress.

So I need a new hobby to tide me over until January. Suggestions from the peanut gallery are, as always, welcome, unless you suggest I learn how to pole dance, or insist that I train to run a marathon. Then I'll break out the Shovel of Doom™ on your sarcastic ass.

20 comments:

Megan said...

Isn't blogging a hobby?

vince said...

Well, how about combining the two - marathon running while pole dancing. You gotta admit, if you could pull that off, there's some serious money to be made.

::runs away cackling evilly::

Janiece said...

Megan, it is, but I already have time allotted for it in my daily routine (as I do for knitting for charity).

I'm trying to figure out how to fill those hours that have heretofore been assigned to homework.

And Vince - you can be replaced, dude. Don't tempt me.

vince said...

As I don't wish to be replaced (and don't want to know with what), here's an actual suggestion - MIT's Open Courseware. It has 2000 courses, is free, courses are all, and it's MIT.

Check it out: http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

vince said...

That's supposed to be "courses are all online."

Janiece said...

Vince, I may have to put you on my celebrity seraglio list for that suggestion. Thanks!

Anne C. said...

Oooh, Vince, that is so cool! Someone remind me of this come the end of October -- though I may be gearing up for NaNoWriMo at that point. Clearly, I need to get a life.

Steve Buchheit said...

Whatever happened to the bass guitar?

Fulfeaki - when a half feaki just won't do.

Janiece said...

Steve, I gave that up quite a while ago - it just felt too much like a chore.

vince said...

Janiece, you're welcome. Anne, I'll try and remember.

By the way, what's a life? :-)

John the Scientist said...

Well, I wuz going to suggest training for a 5K, but I might get whacked with the Trowel of Condemnation. :D

Vagabond said...

You could always dig out the shelter for the inevitable time when all those right wingers you live around go looking for some strident liberal to lynch . . . or you might read Neal Stephenson's "The Baroque Cycle." Three books, about 1200 pages total and it is made of industrial strength AWESOME!

franta - Kris Kringle on too many red bulls

Janiece said...

Vagabond, the Incomparable Anne recommended "Anathem" to me, and it's in my queue. If I like it, I'll add "The Baroque Cycle." Thanks for the suggestion!

David said...

Well, having nearly burned down my house today, I don't recommend learning how to can food. But you could pick some exotic sort of specialty and learn to cook it.

Also, The Baroque Cycle is a lot more accessible than Anathem, since it's written in English. Both were suitably kick-ass works and I highly recommend them, but Stephenson provides you with a full glossary at the back of Anathem for a reason.

Warner (aka ntsc) said...

I was going to go with Vince's suggestion but he beat me to it.

How do you almost burn your house down canning food? I do it, can food that is, a lot and have never ever started even a small fire.

David said...

Warner -

1. Take one (1) first-time canner.
2. Add multiple crises at once.
3. Mix in one (1) paper towel juuuuust a bit outside its proper area and too close to the gas range.
4. FOOOM!
5. Transfer remnants of towel to sink for water bath. Track down and stomp on flaming embers.

Serve with copious whiskey afterward.

Warner (aka ntsc) said...

Now I understand, I'll be canning again in the fall.

Hopefully at that time I'll get back to bloging about it.

Anne C. said...

David - I recommended Anathem because I found it to be a fascinating discourse on Logic (and science as a natural outgrowth) presented as a way of life so regimented as to appear to be structured like a religion (without all that "believe me because I say so" stuff). Knowing her interest in science and logic, I thought Janiece would find that interesting. While there are a few deeply esoteric sections that need the glossary to be *fully* grokked, I found most of the language to be typical (though extremely clever) fictional substitutions and the deeply esoteric sections skimmed or delved into as desired.

I haven't read The Baroque Cycle, so don't know if the subject matter is something Janiece would like, but MY interest is piqued!

Vagabond said...

Ann and Ja-Neese, a quick note on "The Baroque Cycle" as far as subject matter. Takes place during the glorious revolution, covers the transition of alchemy to modern science, the invention of the modern finance and commercial systems, the origins of cryptography and dabbles in mechanical computers, religious dissension, piracy, mental disease, politics and assassination. Oh yes, it's also so funny you'll squirt white wine out of your nose.

solks - morose and surly common people

David said...

Anne - I *loved* Anathem, for all of the reasons that you describe. But it took me about 100 pages to get to the point where I wasn't flipping back and forth to the glossary. It was worth it, but I wish someone had given me a head's up on it.

And I second everything Vagabond said about the Baroque Cycle, both here and on his blog.