Full of Caucusy Goodness

Wednesday, February 6, 2008

I'm full of caucusy goodness from the Douglas County Democratic Caucus last night, where a good time was had by all. I stood up for Barack Obama, as planned, and it appears that he took Colorado at 67%, with Hillary taking 32%, and 1% uncommitted. That was about the split in my precinct, as well. I also signed up to an election judge for the November elections. Janiece, public servant - that's me.

While there, I met a woman named Val, pictured above smiling at the camera. She was an enthusiastic Obama supporter, and was well-versed and articulate regarding Obama's positions, strengths and weaknesses. She was voted as one of our precinct's delegates, and will be representing us in March at the County Caucus. Go, Val!

Val's enthusiasm, and that of her daughter Niki, sitting to Val's husband's left, was somewhat contagious. She thought the entire event was exciting, and was clearly supporting Obama out of a sincere belief in his abilities. Niki was very disappointed that she missed the registration deadline to participate in the caucus due to a recent move from out of state. It made my typical cynicism and recent disillusion with the democratic process feel uncomfortable to me. While I'm still not entirely convinced that Obama will be able to affect permanent change in Washington, I'm a bit more hopeful than I was. So thanks to Val and Niki for the dose of optimism.

I'm also delighted to report that the Dems were as organized as possible given the high turnout, and that the participants were courteous and gracious. No vitriolic name-calling, no "let's whomp them-thar Republicans!", no bible-thumping whack-jobs. Go Dems!

And then there's the Republican caucus (cue ominous music).

Romney won Colorado with 59%, McCain got 19%, and Huckabee got 13%. I'm not surprised at this result, because Colorado is a pretty red state, and we have a large evangelical and LDS population. And no, I'm not implying that Mormans would vote for Romney simply because he's also Morman - it simply removes the concern from their decision making.

My Smart Man went to the Republican caucus, and his report was disturbing, to say the least. In our precinct, the Fundies were out in force, beating the drum for all the favorite Fundy issues...say it with me, kids...The Sanctity of Life, Gay Marriage, and Creationism in Schools! Unbelievably, they actually voted that these issues needed to be included in the Douglas County Republican platform. The vote was overwhelmingly "yay" on all three, with my Smart Man and one other outlier being the only dissenting vote.

Scary, scary.

These people actually believe that abortion, gay marriage and rescinding seperation of Church and State are the most important things for their party to address. Not health care. Not the war. Not the economy. Un-fucking-believable.

I really, really hope that these individuals are not indicative of Douglas County Republicans in general, but are the vocal outliers. If that's the case, then there might be some hope that the moderate Republicans who are currently apathetic might actually take their party back from the Freeze-Dried Whack-a-Loons. You hear that, Moderate Republicans? The whack-jobs have hijacked your party with their activism, and are setting the national agenda based on the idea that rescinding the seperation of Church and State is a really fabulous idea. Who needs that pesky 1st Amendment? Not them!

These people scare me down to my toes.

So the political season continues. My next franchise-related chore is to research the primary candidates for the soon-to-be open seat in the House of Representatives for my district. As previously noted, that Asshat Tom Tancredo will not be seeking reelection, and we need to find a decent, qualified candidate to take that seat.

Fun, fun.

22 comments:

Cindi in CO said...

I work with a man who actually, truly, sincerely believes that ALL of our country's prolems can be traced back to the seperation of church and state.

The really scary thing is, he doesn't appear to be an asshat. He's sweet and charming and not vocally judgemental. He is also the youth pastor at our local New Life Church.

Now THAT'S unsettling.

Michelle K said...

Glad you had fun. Sorry about the asshats.

I keep hoping the fundies will drive a wedge in the Republican party, and eventually split it into religious asshats and fiscal conservatives.

You see how well that's working.

Anne C. said...

I used to work with a guy who was a Creationist. Like the guy Cindi knows, he was a super nice guy and not judgemental in daily life. His brand of evangelicalism simply required believing the the Bible is an infallible document.

Considering my propensity to question, I found it difficult to understand the edict to Not Question.

Janiece Murphy said...

Cindi, I don't doubt that some of these folks are sincere, but they're still fanatics in my book. I'm really, really fond of the Constitution, and people who think the First Amendment needs to be "tweaked" to fit their religious beliefs scare the crap out of me. Ugh.

Michelle, isn't there a saying about hoping, or wishing, or something?

Vince said...

"If wishes were horses, beggars would ride" is the saying.

Unfortunately, even nice wack jobs are still wack jobs. I just don't get it, and I say that as a Christian. The seperation of church and state gives us ALL the freedom to worship, or not worship, as we please. A rare thing in history. But these people can't, or won't, study history. Hell, most won't bother to really study the Bible. Just cherry pick and twist to try and support their prejudices.

This particular brand is all about protecting us from the gay menance, and the this menance and the that menance, and somehow they miss the feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, etc. parts.

Let me state, for the record, that not all of us who consider oursleves Christian are like the people at that Republican caucus. It both saddens and angers me that so many are.

And yes, they scare me as well.

Nathan said...

I'm totally encouraged by the fact that everyone called the Republican races wrong. I love that Huckabee (could you find a less viable candidate?) is still in the thick of it.

As far as I'm concerned, CO going to Romney just keeps the whole thing off balance. :-)

Glad you enjoyed the caucus. Other than walking to the polling place (1.5 blocks away), my civic duty took about 90 seconds to perform.

Janiece Murphy said...

Vince, please don't take my whack-job comments to mean that I believe all people of faith are off their rockers. I certainly don't believe that, nor do I think the regulars around here have that opinion.

Fanatics come in all creeds, including atheism, and I have no use for any of them.

A recent development I think is fabulous is that Bono appears to be the new hero of the younger Christian generation. Even though I'm not a Christian, I think Bono is someone who gets it, and is puting his money where his mouth is when it comes to Christian charity.

Nathan, want to hear a funny? One of the Republican caucus goers thought that a ticket that had Huckabee on it would be unbeatable. Yeah...good luck with that. *Snort*

Cindi in CO said...

J., I think we've talked before about how the scariest evil is the evil that truly believes it is doing good.

It scares me that the fundies don't understand that Freedom OF Religion also means Freedom FROM Religion.

And I believe.

Janiece Murphy said...

Cindi, you're right about the spirit of the 1st Amendment. One of the fastest ways to send me into orbit is to tell me that we're "A Christian Nation, founded on Christian Principles."

Michelle K said...

"If wishes were horses we'd all be eating steak"?

Was that the one you meant?

I actually know a lot of people who seem like reasonably intelligent people, until you realize they believe in creationism.

And it boggles my mind, every time.

John the Scientist said...

I send people like that to the Treaty of Tripoli:

"Art. 11. As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion; as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion, or tranquility, of Mussulmen; and, as the said States never entered into any war, or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation, it is declared by the parties, that no pretext arising from religious opinions, shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries."

Fundies who also happen to be conspiracy theorists will then go on to point out discrepancies between the Arabic and English text. That, however, does not obviate the fact that the US version, with Article 11 in it, was published in US newpapers well before ratification, and no one batted an eye. If the founders and their generation had no problem with that text, then the Fundies have no legs to stand on.

Anne C. said...

ooh, love that quote, John.

Janiece Murphy said...

Yes, Michelle, that's the one!

John, there you go using logic and historical documentation again. I'm not sure what that's about. Jeez.

Nathan said...

John,

That's excellent. Never seen it before and I'm so stealing it!

Janiece, Your presence is hereby requested and required at Polybloggimous. The Hounds of War have been loosed.

John the Scientist said...

Adams signed the Treaty of Tripoli, and also had other things to say along the same vein:

"In his, "A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America" [1787-1788], John Adams wrote:

"The United States of America have exhibited, perhaps, the first example of governments erected on the simple principles of nature; and if men are now sufficiently enlightened to disabuse themselves of artifice, imposture, hypocrisy, and superstition, they will consider this event as an era in their history. Although the detail of the formation of the American governments is at present little known or regarded either in Europe or in America, it may hereafter become an object of curiosity. It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; it will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses.

mom in northern said...

Re: Huckabee
Assuming you are able to stomach his religious views his fiscal views are even more appalling. A general use tax? Please....

Janiece Murphy said...

Mom, skeptic that I am, nothing is more appalling to me than the idea of teaching Young Earth Creationism in public schools.

But I see your point.

Nathan said...

John,

I genuflect. I always feel like such a slacker when you're talking. In a good way.

Val said...

Janiece, thanks so much for the picture and kinds words. You are an amazing writer. Niki says hello. It was great meeting you. Take Care.

By the way, my husband(Bill)is retired Navy.

Tom said...

No, no, no. That can't be the right quote. The right one is:

"Wish in one hand and sh*t in the other, and see which one fills up first."

Unfortunately, those people aren't handing us wishes.

Janiece Murphy said...

Welcome, Val!

Thanks for the inspiration, and thank Bill for his service.

You're welcome here anytime.

Good luck at the County Caucus!

Michelle K said...

Tom,

You apparently have also not watched Firefly.

I'm beginning to worry about you. I have extremely limited TV and movie viewing, yet you have managed to miss all the high points.

What kind of geek are you anyway?!