DMNS Dinosaurs!

Sunday, October 5, 2008
Yesterday the Smart Man, my Hot Mom and I went to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science to see their new visiting exhibit, Dinosaurs - Ancient Fossils, New Discoveries. We also saw the accompanying IMAX film, Dinosaurs Alive.

My reaction? Meh. I enjoyed the graphics where the creators made guesses about how the dinosaurs looked and moved based on new discoveries and skeletal-muscular engineering, and the exhibits had some interesting information about feathers and dinosaurs. But the marketing for this exhibit was so intense, I think I was disappointed by the real deal.

I'm sure that's also mitigated by the fact that while I think dinosaurs are neat in a generic sense, I'm not as interested in that field of endeavor as I am in, say, space.

On a related note, I also ran into Splendid Elles, who was working the dinosaur exhibit in her capacity as a Museum volunteer. It was completely random (as she also noted), and Nathan, I can now definitely attest to the fact that she is indeed a teen girl, rather than a 40 year old double Ph.D. So a shout-out to her, and a "thank you" for her work in educating the public on science.

3 comments:

Nathan said...

You can't fool me. She had a stand-in just to fool you.

I know these things. I do.

Janiece Murphy said...

Yeah, Nathan, you're right.

Splendid Elles is really John the Scientist's alter ego. He just hired the young woman in question here in Denver to throw me off his trail.

I'm sure that's it.

John the Scientist said...

Heh. I saw the movie at the NYMNH. My kids really enjoyed the movie, and the repetitive parts were aimed at their little attention spans. I was left wanting some more meat (cue T. rex joke).

Last year someone found Velociraptor bones with preserved quill knobs, bolstering the idea that they were feathered and extremely active, warm-blooded creatures. Their larger cousin Deinonychus was probably feathered as well, making almost all the dinosaur books my daughter has obsolete. It's a really great way to show how science progresses to little kids.

I showed her the Wiki article with the picture of the quilled bones, and then showed her the quill knobs on a chicken wing. Awesome, awesome stuff.