Neil Gaiman is a Strange, Strange Man

Thursday, July 3, 2008

But I mean that in the nicest possible way.

I finished Interred With Their Bones yesterday. My review: Meh. I usually like whodunits, but in this case, the author spent so much time talking about the history of Shakespeare I kind of drifted in and out and missed some things. So: Meh.

I started Anansi Boys yesterday afternoon, and what a difference. It's read by Lenny Henry, who is doing a fabulous job, and the story is weird, wonderful and strange. Emphasis on strange. Makes me wonder a bit about Neil Gaiman's upbringing.

However, I'm about 25% done, and I'm thoroughly enjoying it. I've decided I love my library. Hear that, Douglas County Library? Love, love, love. I'm sorry I've been gone so long - it won't happen again.

14 comments:

Steve Buchheit said...

Love Anansi Boys on audio (also liked the written version). It's very light compared to American Gods which is set in the same alt world. AG is also very excellent (but I haven't gotten the audio version yet). Hope you enjoy the ending, when things get really weird.

Nathan said...

I loved the book (Anansi Boys). Gaiman's a hell of a writer...saying things in ways that make you go back and read them all over again.

I'm not really giving anything away, but there's a wonderful sentence later in the book that made me just stop and stare at it. You'll know it when you get there, but it's about someone turning in a direction that "moments before, wasn't there."

Janiece Murphy said...

I have noticed a certain gift for a turn of phrase. Especially as it relates to Fat Charlie's future MIL. Hee!

kimby said...

I loved Anansi Boys..and am now reading Fragile Things. Or at least am going to try and read more of it today now that all of the guests are gone!

Anne C. said...

I've read Fragile Things and NG's blog and found them both extremely well written. I bought the first book of the Sandeman (sp?) series (graphic novels) for my brother's birthday on the strength of that writing and he loved it.
So, I've really been wanting to read Anansi Boys for some time now.

Eric said...

Ditto on Anansi Boys being an awesome read. I liked it more than American Gods.

I think, since he wrote part of the book at her house and they've been friends for a very long time (and because of a word that she's used to refer to herself in some of her songs) that Tori Amos has sort of a cameo near the very end of the book. You'll see. Anyway, hope you enjoy it.

Jeri said...

I loved his collaboration with Terry Pratchett, Good Omens. The combination of dark and humorous was amazing.

I just read Neverwhere. It was a good fantasy - but I'm not sure I'd call it great.

Janiece Murphy said...

Jeri, I thought I was the only person on the planet that read and liked that book.

Who knew?

MWT said...

I read American Gods earlier this year - guess I'll put Anansi Boys on the list of things to get next. Though Good Omens might have to come with it since I'm reading a lot of Discworld right now...

Speaking of books: what would be a good first book to introduce myself to Charles de Lint?

Tania said...

Jeri and Janiece - you can add Cindy and myself to people who have read and liked Neverwhere.

Mr. Gaiman has been good to me - I paid off a bunch of debt with my Sandman back issues.

Nathan said...

I didn't read Neverwhere and was kinda Meh about American Gods. Good Omens was excellent!

Steve Buchheit said...

MWT, I haven't read too many of DeLint's novels, but a lot of his short story collections. Onion Girl is like coming in the middle of things (because of his continuing characters), but I think it shows some of his strengths that don't show up in his earlier stories.

Jeri, "Neverwhere" was Neil's "break-out novel." It doesn't have him at his full powers yet. I'd say pick up "Fragile Things" for his short stories, either "American Gods" or "Anansi Boys" I recommend for novels. Each has their strengths (I personally favor AG more because of the overall story, AB is a little lighter in flavor, but still a good romp).

Random Michelle K said...

I love all things Gaiman. I have Neverwhere, but have never gotten around to reading it for some reason.

MWT, I love love love Charles de Lint. (In fact, he's in the list I'm writing as per Jeri's request.) I would definitely start with his shory story collections. Tapping the Dream Tree is my favorite, although Dreams Underfoot is first, and I think a good place to start.

Random Michelle K said...

Here's my page for Charles de Lint